Business & Industry

Bow, New Hampshire - Community Area Profile (PDF)
Bow, New Hampshire - Economic and Labor Profile (PDF)

Introduction


Several major manufacturers are located in Bow. The location, quality of life and land, and tax advantages make it a prime locale for business establishment as well as personal lifestyle.

Bow, NH business park. In this section we detail some of the major businesses of Bow. Also in this section is information on how to develop YOUR business in Bow.
Business Sign

Work Force


Employers relocating to Bow, New Hampshire, can draw both from a well-educated work force of college graduates prepared for management level and technical positions, as well as skilled high school graduates, ready to fill a wide range of manufacturing, service and support openings.

With 3,000 workers employed as of 1997, Bow continues to attract quality people into its workforce. 85% of its males and 70% of Bow's females participate in the workforce, but many are currently traveling to other towns. With more businesses in Bow, percentage would change.

Education of Work Force


Bow has a high rate of education in its labor force. 92% of Bow citizens have a High School Degree or higher. 40% have a Bachelor's Degree or higher.
College Life Long Learning

Development & Construction


To develop a business in the Town of Bow, New Hampshire, begin by contacting the Director of Community Development. The Director can help determine which, if any, permits and approvals you will need and can direct you to the persons you need to contact. You can also obtain information on specific properties and property managers from the Community Development Department.
If you are moving into an existing building, you need to contact the Building Inspector and fire chief to arrange inspections and to file materials reports. You may need a site plan review if the land use is different from the previous occupant of the building. Please also contact the Police Chief to discuss security and patrol issues. The emergency management director will help you file hazardous materials reports.

If you are constructing a new building or an addition, a site plan review is required. Conditional Use Permits for wetlands and aquifer protection are often required. Contact the Director of Planning and Economic Development for requirements and further information. If your property fronts on a state highway, you will need a driveway permit (PDF). Contact the NH Department of Transportation (NHDOT) district engineer for permit requirements.

Following the site plan review process a building permit will also be required. Contact the building inspector for permit requirements. In some cases a subdivision may be required. Contact the Director of Community Development for requirements and further information.

Permits


To develop a business in the Town of Bow, New Hampshire, begin by contacting the Director of Community Development.
Permits can be found at the Bow Town Offices. Building Permits: Contact the building inspector for information or to schedule an appointment to complete the building permit application. Permits are usually issued a week to ten days after submittal of a complete application. All non-residential construction, reconstruction, additions, and renovations require a building permit.

Site Plan Review


Contact the director of planning and economic development for regulations, application forms, and requirements. The site plan review process ensures that development complies with the zoning ordinance and regulations, that the proposal is a workable design, and that the details of parking, loading, drainage, safety, etc. are in place. Site and schematic building plans are required and must be prepared under the supervision of a licensed surveyor and/or engineer. The process includes two Planning Board meetings, notification of abutters, and is typically completed within two months.
Flower Front

Subdivision


Contact the director of planning and economic development for regulations, application forms, and requirements. The review process ensures compliance with zoning and development regulations. Subdivision plans include lot, street, utility, and drainage layouts and must be prepared under the supervision of a licensed surveyor and engineer. The process includes three Planning Board meetings, notification of abutters, and is typically completed within three months. If required public improvements are guaranteed, individual lot development can proceed shortly after subdivision approval.

Driveway Access Permits


The Director of Community Development will direct you to the persons responsible for reviewing and issuing road related permits. The regulation of access to, development of, and use of town roads is shared by the Select Board, Planning Board, building inspector, and public works director. State and federal highways are controlled though the office of the New Hampshire Department of Transportation (NHDOT) District Five Engineer. Town permits are typically issued as a part of a site plan review, subdivision approval, or building permit and generally do not add any time to the process. NHDOT permits are issued after a separate, parallel process which may take two or more months to complete.

Conditional Use Permit (CUP)


Contact the director of planning and economic development for regulations, application forms, and requirements. Prior to the approval of site plan reviews, subdivisions, and building permit applications in specified areas, a CUP for activities in or near wetlands and aquifer recharge areas may be required. Site plans must depict wetlands or aquifer recharge areas on the property, existing and proposed buildings, driveways, and parking areas, and other areas to be disturbed. Plans are usually prepared under the supervision of a certified soils or wetlands scientist. Town boards and officials rely heavily on input from the Conservation Commission in issuing Conditional Use Permits. CUP' s are typically reviewed along with site plans and subdivisions and do not add to the review time period. If processed separately, a CUP generally is completed in one month.

Other State Permits (wetlands, septic, site specific/alteration of terrain, shoreland protection)


The State of New Hampshire, through its Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) regulates activities associated with wetlands, erosion, and sedimentation of surface waters. Activities which are within a wetland or adjacent to a prime wetland, which include on-site disposal of sewage, which disturb at least 100,000 square feet of surface area, or which are within 250 feet of a pond or fourth order stream may require a permit from the NHDES. Contact the permits bureau for rules, application forms, and requirements. In general, NHDES will not proceed with a permit application until Town permits are conditionally approved. The NHDES review process may take two or more additional months to complete.
Photo credit: Eric Anderson